Category Archives: Tips for China Job Seekers

Tips for China Job Seekers are helpful to you when you want to start a career in the country.

Top Potential Interview Questions from Chinese Employers

Are you going to a job interview in a Chinese company? Get yourself prepared before the pontial employer’s interview questions become troubles rather than fans.
1) Tell me about yourself
The Chinese employer likes to ask the same question as western ones do. But the difference is, when you answer, try to show off your Chinese language ability. If you have not handle the hard language, just use one or two Chinese words as your beginning of the interview. Then, speak easy and simple English to express something about yourself. Remember, easy and simple English. Never use a big English word that prevent the Chinese Employer from understand you easily.
2) Do you like China?
In fact, the interviewer does not care about whether or not you like it. He just wants to hear something about your impressions on the country. Please use simple and easy English to tell what you like and what you dislike. Take it easy.
3) Why do you want this job?
When you are in a western country, you say you need money. That’s ok. But in China, that is not the best answer. Tell the Chinese employer how you like it, and you want it not completely for making a living.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn

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A post for Chinese resume templates for fresh graduates

I just made a post about Chinese resume templates at Cabi.net.cn’s JobTalk, an online forum for China job seekers. You can download the templates directly.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn

Do Dubbing Jobs in China?

China’s advertising and media industries needs quite a lot of the expats in the country to do the dubbing jobs. The simple reason is, for example, a Chinese slogan with its counterpart in English, may make a brand more international. Right?
China Job List updated its job position information, including bubbing jobs offerred by Jinnuo Jiayin, a Beijing-based dubbing service provider. The company needs the expats in China with nice voice. The jobs are available part time or full time.
You can visit SinoSites.com to check more job sites, if you are look for a China job.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn

Want to be an English teacher in China?

If you would like to be a teacher, you can visit esljobs.cn, which updates a lot of teaching job positions each day.
esljobs.cn features a powerful job search engine with detail information on locations and teaching positions. In the search tool, its location options include all of China’s provinces, and teaching positions cover different education organizations ranging from kingdergarten, elementary school, to university.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn

More China job sites

I am continuing to introduce useful China jobs sites here.

Sinosites.com, a community to discover and share the China-centered sites useful to the expats in the country, has updated its sites for China jobs.

This time, http://www.meijob.com and http://china.recruit.net, two China job search engines are listed on SinoSites.com. And their English versions are available. That is a good news for the expats in China.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn

How to get a good Chinese name before sending out your resume

You want a job in China, and you need a Chinese name. It does not sound like a gold rule, but it works better than a rule. In your resume, an expat’s Chinese name, maybe, interests a HR manager, — human being has a great curiosity. HR manager is no exception.

There are two styles of Chinese-name-making. Firstly, make a very Chinese-like name, which consists of suname and forename. In Chinese, there are over one hundred sunames (called Bai Jia Xing in Pinyin). Just choose one for yourself based on your interest and the pronunciation of your English suname. And then make a forename. You have to be very creative, since Chinese making is an art. Make it easy remembered, having a good connotation and pronunciation in Chinese.

Secondly, just use the translated Chinese name from your English one. I know many do not like translation of name, for it make no sense. One point, however, should be put on the advantage of translated name: It makes HR manager know quickly you are an expat rather than a Chinese candidate. You translated Chinese name will attract their eyeballs.

About.com has some stuff about Chinese name, and it may help you.

China Jobs Blog by Cabi.net.cn